Posts Tagged ‘moment’

Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight” Odes LeBron James’ Memorable 2007 ECF Moment

Nowadays there’s a lot of chatter surrounding LeBron James as the best basketball player of all time. An argument that only ruffles feathers when Michael Jordan enters the conversation. James is an unrivaled all-time great with the championships, MVPs and stats to reinforce said claim. But back in the late 2000s he was simply great, not yet an all-time great.

It would be the moments to come that would lift James into the upper echelon of hoops hierarchy. And while countless plays and games come to mind, his performance in Game 5 of the 2007 Eastern Conference Finals stand out among the most remarkable.

In a close game against a veteran Detroit Pistons team, James put the Cavs on his back and rattled off 25 straight points to lift his team to a thrilling 109-107 victory. LeBron finished the game just shy of a 50-piece with 48 points, shooting 11 for 13 on those final 25 points.

Nike’s “Championship Think 16” Pack honors this historic moment in Bron history with not only a special edition “25 Straight” release, but the very first retro of his Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1. The colorway closely replicates the pair James wore on that faithful day in 2007 with a few special notations to commemorate the release.

The Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight” is set to drop on May 31 which, fittingly, marks the anniversary of that incredible Game 5.

Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 "25 Straight"
Nike Zoom LeBron Soldier 1 “25 Straight”

Source: weibo

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Fashion Girl of Today:Camo Moment

Camo Moment
by KimTuttle

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Can We Take a Moment to Marvel at Kristen Stewart’s Next-Level…

Can We Take a Moment to Marvel at Kristen Stewart’s Next-Level Menswear Game?

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Please take a moment to appreciate Bill Murray’s SNL-era…

Please take a moment to appreciate Bill Murray’s SNL-era mustache

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Amy Poehler should have won an Emmy for this moment alone 

Amy Poehler should have won an Emmy for this moment alone 

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Hennessy Black: A Moment with Ben Clymer of HODINKEE

In 2008, Ben Clymer hung up his hat as Project Manager at UBS to focus full-time on editorial pursuits under his web-based platform HODINKEE. With a passion for discovering unique timepieces, the then fledgling blog has since built itself to be one of the go-to mainstays for the industry’s most noteworthy inventions. Delivering unique content via it’s multimedia channels, Clymer and his cohort of watch critics present in-depth interviews, reports and reviews, whether its a conversation with vintage sports watch collectors or putting the Rolex Submariner 1680 to test via a deep-sea dive trip in the British Virgin Islands. As an extension of the webpage, Clymer also creates limited-edition wristwatch accessories sold exclusively via HODINKEE’s e-boutique store. In conjunction with Hennessy Black, we caught up with the New York-based editor to learn more about how he turned his passion into a career, and the necessary traits needed to be successful.

Can you introduce yourself and what you do?

My name is Ben Clymer, I’m the founder of a watch blog called HODINKEE. I essentially fly around the world to discover all the latest new releases from the best Swiss, German, and Japanese watchmakers, and then report on them via HODINKEE. I also go out and chase fantastic vintage pieces that may not have been discovered yet. We try to tell their stories in an interesting way. In addition to the blog, HODINKEE also designs, produces, and sells hand-made accessories for people interested in watches and other mechanical things.

Where does your interest in watches stem from? What sort of emotional connection do you have with a timepiece?

I was always fascinated by mechanical things. I remember when I was six or seven, my Dad, who was a photographer, gave me a light meter. And I just loved this handheld object with a giant gauge in the middle. From there it was compasses, and eventually watches. When I was 16, my grandfather gave me the mechanical watch off his wrist – an Omega Speedmaster. That present set off the obsession.

What drew you to starting your own blog? Would you still consider HODINKEE a blog?

It was out of just a love for writing and photographing, and for the watches themselves. It was never intended to be a business. I was bored at my old job as a project manager at UBS. I don’t really consider it a blog, it’s much more than that. But then again I don’t get upset if people call it one. I went to journalism school, we produce beautiful original multimedia packages that put anything in the print world to shame. This has helped build my editorial ethics with HODINKEE. Because we’re online, people call us a blog. It doesn’t really do us justice but anyone who calls us a blog just doesn’t get it. They will, though.

Was it like flipping a switch when you started HODINKEE?

Not at all. It was a long process and a real hustle. I wouldn’t say we really took off until about two years ago, after I finished graduate school, almost 4 years into the project.

What motivated you/inspired you to pursue HODINKEE full-time?

For the first time in my life I really loved what I was doing. There’s so much that could and should be changed about the way luxury handled digital media. It just made sense to keep pushing.

What are some long-term goals you aim to accomplish? How far along would you say you are?

I just want to create a platform that lets new people explore the world of mechanical art, and do it in an educated way. I want HODINKEE to be the digital ambassador for watches for generations, to teach people in an insightful, interactive way. We are getting there, and you’ll see a total redesign and re-launch in the coming months to help this happen. There is still a lot left to discover.

Could you describe the traits necessary to be successful when there’s uncertainty ahead?

You have to be able to do everything, and anything. Whether its a private dinner with the CEO of Cartier or hauling a box of envelopes up seven flights of stairs, you just have to be reactive. Don’t be judgmental, be open to everyone and everything. When you judge other people, that’s how you miss out on learning from them. Be open.

Where do you go to for inspiration and knowledge? 

I surround myself with people I respect. I don’t know the most about any one topic, but I know a lot about many topics. I  think that’s a great way to go through life. When I develop interest towards a new topic, I become friendly with whomever is the leading expert and learn all I can.

Beyond work, how do you make time to relax and decompress? How often do you make time to unwind?

I don’t have much time to decompress. But when I do, it’s usually by discovering the area around New York by car. I love to drive, and there are so many beautiful things to see even within 2 hours of NYC.

How do you enjoy your Hennessy Black? 

I usually have it on the rocks or as a Manhattan.

How does time away from work and the grind put you in the right frame of mind for progress?

It’s really difficult, especially because we’re online and live all the time. It takes something or someone really special in order to separate.

What’s on the checklist when you’re looking for a new spot to hang out at?

I am over the point of where I want to be at a place that people are talking about. I want something comfortable, well designed, and cool.

What are some places you recently discovered that are on the cusp of blowing up?

There are some amazing coffee spots in Geneva and Paris that are doing great things. The idea of artisanal coffee doesn’t really exist in Europe like it does in the US. Coffee is just “good” in Europe. Soon, we’ll see the slow roasted SF and Brooklyn style cafe hit and blow up in Paris and Geneva.


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Hennessy Black: A Moment with Sean Sullivan of The Impossible Cool

While originally from Philadelphia, Sean Sullivan spent a large segment of his career honing his craft as a photographer in New York before recently moving to Los Angeles. Sullivan’s commercial accolades include campaign work for J.Crew, Tiffany & Co., Ghurka and Wolverine to name a few, yet for the most part, his loyal following is reaped from The Impossible Cool – his Tumblr page that boasts a whirlpool of striking monochromatic photographs of style icons. From Hollywood stars, presidents to unsung heroes, the site consists of compelling portraits taken by Daido Moriyama, Man Ray, Anton Corbijn and others who influence Sullivan’s sought-after aesthetics. Here, Sullivan shares with us the origin of The Impossible Cool, his long-term goals as a creative, and how he likes his Hennessy.

Can you introduce yourself and what you do?

My name is Sean Sullivan…I’m a photographer, occasional filmmaker and creator of The Impossible Cool. Originally from Philadelphia but these days I call Los Angeles home.

What was life-like before The Impossible Cool?

Life consisted of long hours working in New York film production as a location scout. I made my  living exploring the five boroughs of the city, searching and photographing places that fit the narratives we were working on. I wanted to work independently, and when The Impossible Cool started building a buzz, it allowed me to do just that. I left the film world and started to chisel away a new path through photo and video projects with fashion brands. I guess life remained the same, but my work focus changed massively.

Did you have a game plan or case study as to how The Impossible Cool would play out?

Not at all. The best things happen unplanned.

You’re mostly known for your striking monochromatic approach to photography, how did you develop this style?

I’ve always been taught that an artist finds his voice by trying, failing or succeeding and trying again. The heavy black and white style is just what came out after years of pointing my lens at people and places. Also, I’ve always admired photographers with heavy black and white styles like Daido Moriyama, Man Ray and Anton Corbijn so it’s safe to say that’s filtered through as well.

What continues to drive your interest in The Impossible Cool?

There will always be a photographer I don’t know or a particular shot I’ve never seen, so my interest in the collection is constantly being refreshed. I’ve been lucky enough to be invited to a few massive photo archives like Getty and Archivio Cameraphoto in Italy. Trips like that where I’m holding negatives in my hand most people have never seen before remind me there is something special with the site.

What are some long-term goals you aim to accomplish? How far along would you say you are?

I’m happy with what I’m putting out into the world. So far so good.

Could you describe the traits necessary to be successful when there’s uncertainty ahead?

Accepting that fear is not a natural state and that anything can be done with enough time and perseverance. Most people, including myself, get to a point of giving up right at the moment you need to keep pushing through. If you get past that you can do anything…it could take decades but it will happen.

How do you continue to educate yourself and continue to explore new things to help yourself grow?

By trying to see everything as a source of inspiration. I’ve been lucky to be surrounded by people who have excellent taste in culture and I’m constantly being influenced by them. I’m also a book and magazine addict.

Beyond work, how do you relax and decompress? How often do you make time to unwind?

Daily. We’re on this earth to enjoy it. Especially now that I’m living in California it’s super easy to walk outside or take a drive down PCH and leave all the stresses somewhere else.

How do you enjoy your Hennessy Black? 

Straight up, sipped slow.

How does time away from work and the grind put you in the right frame of mind for progress?

For me progress comes in the form of experimentation. Constantly trying to move my eye forward by trying and trying again. I’m one of those lucky souls that does what he loves for a living, so my work tends to go with me everywhere.

What’s on the checklist when you’re looking for a new spot to hang out at?

Good food, better music and a ‘no bottles with sparklers’ policy.

What are some places you recently discovered that are on the cusp of blowing up?

La Poubelle is a restaurant close to home that I end up at quite a bit. You can sit outside with friends and grab a drink for hours just like NYC or Paris. There’s always cool people hanging out and I’ve yet to have a bad meal.

I was also in Shanghai last month and saw some cool stuff going on over there. The city is changing immensely and the kids that live there are hungry to make their mark. I even ran into a few friends from NYC that have moved over there to start night spots or open galleries. It’s a city that’s ripe for creatives to do their thing.


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