Posts Tagged ‘Calls’

Pusha T Reveals Why Kanye West Calls Him In The Middle Of The Night

Kanye West’s brand of leadership is very Michael Scott-esque. Yeezy seems like a kindhearted and familial boss who means well, but ultimately revels in the unbridled chaos of it all. In an interview with Power 105.1′s Angie Martinez, Pusha T opened up about his new album, DAYTONA, a potential tour with Nas, and updates on the rest of the G.O.O.D. Music roster. However, the most fascinating portion of the conversation arrived when Pusha described the challenges of working with West during the album making process.

“He [Kanye] changed my artwork last night at 1 a.m.,” Push said. “He changed my artwork at 1 a.m. ’cause he wasn’t feeling it.”

According to the G.O.O.D. Music president, the artwork for his album was completed and agreed upon by all parties. However, at the last minute Kanye decided the photos weren’t exactly what the world needed to see.

“[At] 1 a.m. my phone rings, no caller ID,” he continued. “‘Hey, yeah, I think we should change the artwork. I like this other artwork.’ Now this other artwork is 85 grand, right. I said, hey, I don’t want to pay for that and I wasn’t even going to ask you to pay for that. We picked what we picked. It’s here. It’s ready. [He said,] ‘No this is what people need to see to go along with this music. I’mma pay for that.’”

Kanye is reportedly producing four more albums in the coming weeks. Guess Kid Cudi, Teyana Taylor, and Nas are going to be getting a lot of early morning phone calls.

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J. Cole Calls SoundCloud Rappers ‘Exaggerated Versions Of Black Stereotypes’

J. Cole didn’t pull any punches on “1985 (Intro To ‘The Fall Off’)”. The KOD closer finds the Fayetteville rapper taking shots at anonymous rappers who glorify stereotypical portrayals of African-Americans. Many people think Cole’s subliminals are for Lil Pump or Smokepurpp. However, in a new Vulture profile, Cole reveals his critique is meant for a variety of people.

“It’s really a ‘shoe fits’ situation — several people can wear that shoe,” Cole said. “Why you yelling at your show? You must feel attacked in some kind of way, must feel offended, and if you feel offended, then that means something rings true, something struck a chord. That’s cool with me. That’s all I ever want to do.”

Cole made a more pointed statement later in the interview about the caricatures many SoundCloud rappers paint of the black community.

“If you exclude the top three rappers in the game, the most popping rappers all are exaggerated versions of black stereotypes,” the Kids on Drugs rapper continued. “Extremely tatted up. Colorful hair. Flamboyant. Brand names. It’s caricatures, and still the dominant representation of black people, on the most popular entertainment format for black people, period.”

On “1985,” Cole describes why he believes a white audience wants to see negative portrayals of black and brown artists.

But have you ever thought about your impact?
These white kids love that you don’t give a fuck
‘Cause that’s exactly what’s expected when your skin black
They wanna see you dab, they wanna see you pop a pill
They wanna see you tatted from your face to your heels
And somewhere deep down, fuck it, I gotta keep it real
They wanna be black and think your song is how it feels

Recently, Cole has released two videos from KOD — “A.T.M.” and “Kevin’s Heart.” Both songs see the Dreamville rapper taking a close look at the addictive qualities of money, sex, and drugs. It’s safe to say Cole has a message to tell and he isn’t slowing down anytime soon.

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Logic Calls Out Trump’s ‘Shithole Countries’ Line In Impassioned Grammy Performance

Following his powerful performance of “1-800-273-8255” at the VMAs last year, Logic delivered yet another show-stopping moment at the Grammys on Sunday night (January 28).

With Alessia Cara and Khalid by his side, the rapper performed his suicide prevention anthem with stunning poignancy and emotion. Once again, he was surrounded by suicide attempt survivors and loss survivors, and the screens behind him lit up with the song’s title, named after the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. At the end of the song, Logic launched into a fiery speech that urged the crowd to “stand and fight for those who are not weak, but have yet to discover the strength that the evil of this world has done its best to conceal.”

He continued, “On behalf of those who fight for equality in a world that is not equal, not just, and not ready for the change we are here to bring, I say unto you, bring us your tired, your poor, and any immigrant who seeks refuge. For together, we can build not just a better country, but a world that is destined to be united.”

Following his performance, Logic shared a photo of the print-out of his speech on Twitter. Notably, he wrote “NOT SHITHOLES” in big, bold letters to describe “beautiful countries filled with culture, diversity, and thousands of years of history.” His word choice was bleeped on the CBS telecast, but it’s vital that he got the message across: one that clearly calls out President Trump’s recent comments about immigrants.

“1-800-273-8255” lost both categories it was nominated for this year — Song of the Year and Best Music Video — but it’s performances like these that prove its remarkable impact.

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